Ubuntu Eee – The OS Your EEE Should Have Been Born With

On finishing a long contract and project at the BBC a few months ago, I was incredibly touched to be given a brand new Asus EEE PC as a leaving gift by my colleagues.

Although I loved the tiny form factor and take it with me practically everywhere, I was never quite satisfied with the default Xandros Linux and have fidgeted around ever since trying out different options, spending way too much time on the on the excellent eeeuser.com community site, zapping the flash drive with different distros.

Finally this evening I think I found the answer: http://www.ubuntu-eee.com/

Slick, easy to install, great looking, and of course a proper operating system under the hood. Props to the team who put this together, it’s terrific. If you have one of these little beauties yourself, I highly recommend checking it out.

Linux / OS X Newbie Tips

Comments (0)

Permalink

Fetch and Parse HTML Web Page Content From Bash. Wow.

Okay, this is another one of those linux newbie posts where I tried to figure out how to do something that’s probably really obvious to all you seasoned hackers out there.

Anyway here I go clogging up the internet with a post that somebody, somewhere will hopefully find useful.

Are you that person? Well… have you ever used the shell command curl to fetch a web page? It’s cool, isn’t it, but you do end up with a splurge of ugly HTML tags in your terminal shell:

Eugh!

So… how about we parse that HTML into something human-readable?

Continue Reading »

Linux / OS X Newbie Tips

Comments (11)

Permalink

Use Rsync to Copy Your ASP.NET Website

If you’ve ever tried to copy the source files from a Visual Studio 2005 ASP.NET solution, especially if you’re using TFS and Resharper, you’ll have probably noticed all great steaming heaps of fluff and nonsense these tools leave all over your hard drive. Not to mention all the built assemblies lurking in your bin/Debug folders.

If you have a unix/linux/apple machine handy, or have at least had the sense to instal cygwin or coLinux on your quaint old PC, then give this a rumble.

Continue Reading »

Linux / OS X Newbie Tips

Comments (2)

Permalink

Printing Your Todo.txt Lists to Index Cards at the Command Line

Like a few other people, I’m over kGTD. In the first flushes of my infatuation with the way of GTD she was good to me, showed me a few tricks I’d never seen before. We had some good times, syncing away. But my iCal started to fill up with billions of pointles calendars, my projects started to indent to the point where I couldn’t find them anymore, and I never quite got the hang of those… unique keyboard combos needed to navigate around Omni Outliner Pro. Sometimes, important things would go missing, and I gradually started to trust her less, and go back to paper and pens for my lists.

Until now. Todo.txt is a series of command-line scripts for slicing and dicing a text-based todo list. If you stick to a few conventions, you can use the scripts to suck out relevant information as and when you need it. Combined with the humble yet awesome power of the bash shell’s pipe, there are a multitude of ways you can shove your action lists in front of your lazy face. Trust me, if you keep or have ever kept your lists in a text file, you owe it to yourself to check the site out.

Something I always wanted to do with kGTD but never managed to in satisfactory manner was to sync my digital lists to index cards for perusing whilst (gasp!) off-line. Enter linux’s lp command:

todo.sh list | lp -o PageSize=Custom.3x5in -o page-top=10 -o page-bottom=10 -o page-left=5 -o page-right=5 -o lpi=8 -o cpi=15
See here for an explanation of all those crazy lp options.

I just love this stuff. Sometimes it’s almost as good as being back at the terminal of my faithful BBC Micro.

Uncategorized

Comments (0)

Permalink

Web-Based Backup… Via a Trickle

A project I’ve been meaning to do for some time is set up a backup of the crucial folders on my home server to somewhere on the web. Preferably somewhere free, like my existing dreamhost space.

What I didn’t really consider is… and I bet you’ve already guessed it, dear reader: the piddly-poor upload speed on my ADSL connection. Quoted at 448 Kbps, by my reckoning that means I’ll get about 3.3GB up the wire in a 24 hour period… which means we may be here for quite some time. Better turn off that pesky Windows Update.

The nice thing is that, because I’m using rsync, once the initial sync is done, only the changes to files will be uploaded, so traffic should drop back to normal… some time in 2008.

Uncategorized

Comments (0)

Permalink

SSH on Cygwin

I’m following Gina Trapani’s outstanding tutorials on lifehacker to get me some of that unix command-line joy on the rusty old windows box in the corner.

Note to other linux-naive cygwin users out there. If you want to install the ssh command, look for the package called ‘openssh’. No amount of staring at the packages squid and ssmtp is going to make it appear where you might expect it to.

Uncategorized

Comments (0)

Permalink